ASC Short Courses


Pre-registering for these Short Courses is required. Sign up for these Short Courses conveniently while registering for ASC 2020 by October 23, 2020.


Power Devices

Date: Saturday, October 24, 2020
Time: 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (EDT)
Cost: $50 Students / $75 Regular and Retiree

Description: Superconducting Power Devices can greatly benefit the power grid by providing higher efficiency systems and improved reliability. They also present a high value proposition for more electric transportation by providing power density levels unmatched by conventional systems. This short course will provide an overview of superconducting power devices including superconducting motors and generators, fault current limiters, cables, transformers, SMES. The course will present the basic principles, physical parameters, analytical and numerical tools used for superconducting power devices design and optimization. The course will show examples of existing devices and discuss the potential market and adoption barriers for superconducting power devices.

Instructor:

Philippe Masson (AML Superconductivity and Magnetics)


Fusion Magnets   

Date: Saturday, October 24, 2020
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. (EDT)
Cost: $50 Students / $75 Regular and Retiree

Description: The aim of this short course is to provide an overview upon the main magnet systems deployed in magnetic confinement fusion devices of the tokamak type. By starting from the basic scaling laws linking plasma performances to magnetic field intensity, the main design philosophies and architectures of present and future tokamak magnet systems will be reviewed. Following this general overview, the attention will be focused on the functions and criteria adopted in the ITER project to design the toroidal and poloidal field magnet systems. Mechanical as well as superconducting design features will be described in detail to highlight the intimate inter-link between these two aspects and how they differentiate between the toroidal and the poloidal field system. To conclude, few design examples will be illustrated step by step to improve the attendee’s understanding of the basic concepts discussed.

Instructor:

Alfredo Portone (Fusion for Energy)


High Temperature Superconducting Materials and Magnet Technologies

Date: Sunday, October 25, 2020
Time: 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (EDT)
Cost: $50 Students / $75 Regular and Retiree

Description: After three decades of arduous development, three high-Tc cuprate materials have been developed into long-length composite conductors with high critical current density at magnetic fields or temperatures beyond the reach of Nb-Ti and Nb3Sn materials. Applications are emerging, including magnets for >1 GHz NMR spectroscopy, high-field fusions, and the next generation of high energy particle colliders. In this course we will learn the design, fabrication, electromagnetic properties, and practical engineering properties of state-of-the-art high-temperature superconducting tape, wire, and cable conductors. We will also review and discuss the design and key aspects of HTS magnet technologies, including magnetization and shielding current effects, quench detection and protection, and management of stress and strains.

Instructors:

Tengming Shen and Xiaorong Wang (LBNL)


Helium Cryogenics

Date: Sunday, October 25, 2020
Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (EDT)
Cost: $50 Students / $75 Regular and Retiree

Description: This short course will first provide an overview of the thermal and mechanical properties of cryogenic helium in both the classical liquid phase (He I) and the superfluid phase (He II). Their applications in cooling various scientific and engineering equipment, especially superconducting magnets and devices, will be outlined. Then, the unique thermal counterflow heat transfer mode in He II will be discussed in detail, and a two-fluid model will be presented to explain the various unconventional thermal and hydrodynamic behaviors of He II. Example problems relevant to the design of He II based cooling systems will be discussed. Finally, some recent-year progress in developing cutting-edge measurement technology, especially flow visualization technology, for cryogenics helium research and applications will be reviewed.

Instructor:

Wei Guo (Florida State University)


LTS Magnets

Date: Saturday, October 31, 2020
Time: 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (EDT)
Cost: $50 Students / $75 Regular and Retiree

Description: This course covers the design of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators and detectors. The lectures are intended for physicists and engineers working in the areas of magnet technology and applied superconductivity, and interested in basic principles, physical parameters, analytical and numerical tools used for superconducting magnet design. For each of the applications considered, the courses will start by presenting the properties and characteristics of superconducting strands and cables. The main concepts related to magnetic design and coil lay-outs will be then outlined. In addition, the lectures will deal with the mechanics and fabrication techniques of a superconducting magnet, focusing in particular on coils and the structural components aimed at containing the electro-magnetic forces and managing the stresses. Finally, a description of the different systems devoted to cool and protect a magnet after a quench will be provided.

Instructors:

Paolo Ferracin (CERN) and Herman ten Kate (CERN, University of Twente)


High Field Magnets for MRI and NMR Applications

Date: Saturday, November 7, 2020
Time: 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (EST)
Cost: $50 Students / $75 Regular and Retiree

Description: This course covers design issues of superconducting magnets, both HTS and LTS, focusing on high field MRI and NMR applications that require spatial uniformity and temporal stability of magnetic field. Topics include: (1) electromagnetic field analysis with precision; (2) mechanical stress analysis with reinforcement; (3) thermal stability evaluation; (4) post-quench analysis and protection circuit design. A main goal is to provide an overview of the overall design process of superconducting MRI/NMR magnet. And some latest technical issues such as screening current stress and mechanical failure are also discussed.

Instructor:

Prof. Seungyong Hahn (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seoul National University)


Superconductor Electronics Technology Roadmap for IRDS 2021

Date: Saturday, November 7, 2020
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. (EST)
Cost: $50 Students / $75 Regular and Retiree

Description:

Technology roadmapping helped the semiconductor community to successfully coordinate research and development efforts for over two decades. In 2018, Cryogenic Electronics and Quantum Information Processing (CEQIP) became an international focus team (IFT) within the International Roadmap for Devices and Systems (IRDS). The updated roadmapping process is driven both bottom-up by devices and top-down by systems application requirements. Models, metrics, and benchmarks predict device and system performance and guide technology roadmapping to meet application requirements. The 2020 report [1] included the first roadmaps for superconductor electronics.

The goal of the workshop is to identify and discuss areas needing improvement in the 2021 report. Examples include metrics for logic family comparisons, future device roadmaps, group forecasting processes, and how to incorporate economic drivers. The workshop is open to all who are interested.

[1] “Cryogenic Electronics and Quantum Information Processing,” IEEE International Roadmap for Devices and Systems, 2020IRDS_CEQIP, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://irds.ieee.org/editions/2020.

Instructor:

D. Scott Holmes (IEEE Council on Superconductivity)